Category Archives: Templeton

Ambyth

Lots of wineries these days are organic and even biodynamic. Some go above and beyond these practices and make natural wines, using fewer additives or chemicals. Yet, even fewer go as far as Ambyth Estate who does not even use herbicides. They use these clay tanks to extract as much true grape flavor as possible.

Their wines have lively bright acidity with crisp lip smacking grape flavor you haven’t tasted in a while. They make them the old fashioned way so be prepared to taste something akin to old world wines. For example, their Marsanne has wonderful layers of melon, thick lemon meringue, and an elegant body with luscious crispness. Their reds are aged in neutral oak barrels to keep their crisp acidity and grape typicity on the forefront. Bring your vegetarian and vegan friends to this tasting room for a true lesson on natural wines.


15C

A sure sign that a town is quickly becoming a wine destination is the opening of a wine bar that quickly gets packed with people every night. 15C is proof Templeton is on the move. The town right next door to Paso Robles already has one or two tasting rooms downtown within walking distance of salons, restaurants, and shopping. Now, they also have a fab wine bar where you can get a taste of a few different wines, selected by someone more savvy in the juice than yourself, for the price of a glass. This is always best if you cannot decide what glass to order or if you want to surprise your palate with a variety from a region or showcase a varietal or type of wine. It is also the choice if you simply believe in variety.

15C has a wide following on any given weekday after 5PM, the local choice for happy hour or a great escape for those god-what-a-day kinda days. Outside and roadside patio dining and pounding make it the cure for any type of day.
I tasted a white flight of wines that included a bonus rose. That’s about a 2 ounce pour of 3 white wines and a pink wine for only 8 bucks! So, really, it’s cheaper than a glass of wine and a great way to meet the locals. Free wifi and a fab Chrome from Ranchero Cellars will keep us coming back.


Temple Ton

Ever wonder why life keeps taking you to certain places? Me either. Instead, it’s probably best to get a little zen, thank your lucky stars that life is such an adventure, and just enjoy where the road takes ya. This month, its a cat sitting gig in Templeton for free rent. What can I say. Wine blogging doesn’t pay! Luckily, he’s a wonderfully fuzzy cool cat. So, I’m enjoying this town all over again!

Templeton is such a quaint town with a ton going for it and tremendous potential. Even though it is located between two larger towns, Trader Joe’s chose Templeton as a location over its neighbors to the north and south: Paso Robles and Atascadero. It also has quite a few great salons, restaurants, and shopping all in a strollable downtown area. Its short distance from Paso Robles makes it more than just an overflow location. It could become a wine destination all its own for those who prefer cooler breezes and less traffic. A newly opened wine bar is now thriving on Main street beckoning others to follow. More on that after I test it.


Castoro Cellars

Back when the Central Coast was just getting on the map, Castoro Cellars was finding petrified whale bones under their soil, proving its value for growing grapes. If this area was once covered by ocean, imagine the nutrients it has.

In the last 30 years, they have become known for Zinfandel wine grown organically while most of their neighbors have begun producing Rhone wines. Situated right across Highway 46 West from Paso Robles, their vineyards still benefit from the hot summer days and cool breezes at night rolling through the Templeton Gap. Stop in while you’re traveling through the Central Coast to get a taste of their history.


ZinAlley

Named after the natural alleyway created by the Templeton Gap, ZinAlley takes full advantage of what this natural wonder does for vines. The scorching hot days and cool nights are the reason its dry-farmed head-pruned Zinfandel vines thrive and produce deliciously rich complex juice. Their winemaker is as real as it gets, even foregoing advertising and marketing because he prefers to run a business on old school tried and true practices like word-of-mouth the recommendations of many happy customers. Living off what is now the Turley estate, he honed his Zin skills early and still takes advantage of distinctive practices like using dried stems for a smoky flavor rather than green stems that can impart abrasive herbal qualities.

A self-proclaimed glorified home wine maker, he is happy to tell customers the real history of Central Coast wine. Stop in to ZinAlley when you’ve had it with stuffy pretentious wineries and their standard family history stories or tales of the town. ZinAlley is a one-man show and their fearless leader will give you the straight dirt on the soil, climate, vines, and winemaking history of this ripe rich region.

 


Cypher

Feed the heresy in your thoughts or your unconventional side the luscious and rich wines at Cypher Winery. Their unoaked Chardonnay has that vibrant crisp bright green apple fruit like the famed Naked Chardonnay you may recall from Four Vines. Yes, that label was sold but the heretic behind the Heretic is now making wines at Cypher.

LiveLessOrdinary

If you’re part of the cult following for Mourvedre and you crave that “dirty sexy Frenchman” barnyard earthy flavor that reminds you of mushrooms, theirs has the stone fruit flavors you’ll that hit the spot and the forest floor so common in this grape. Their Kiler Canyon is big yet smooth, a wine that typifies Paso style. And, who doesn’t love a Zin Bitch.

ZinBitch

Opening a new restaurant in March, Cypher is using their food industry experience to play well with their wines. An onsite organic garden will be the secret ingredient to their delicious farm fresh food right outside the rustic tasting room on Highway 46 West.


Turley

If you’re a Zin Bitch, been to Zin Fest, or you just love Zinfandel, you’ve no doubt heard of Larry Turley. He is not only famous for making rich luscious Zinfandels and bringing this grape to its potential as a world-class varietal, he has intrigued wine buyers and sommeliers across the land, showcasing his wine on some of the best fine dining menus around. But what you may not know is what a crusader he is for old vines.

Remember, a grape vine takes about 30 years to reach its potential in terms of grape production. Thereafter, it produces fewer grapes with more concentrated flavors. It is up to wineries to make the tough decision of quantity or quality with older vines and the sad truth is most vines are grubbed up and replaced after 50 years of age. But, heroes like Turley and his team of viticulture and wine making geniuses pursue the old and threatened vines for their complex flavors and even historic qualities over mass production.

The fruit of their labors is powerful, dense, and richly complex Zinfandels with many layers and textures that play well with food pairings yet stand alone as if a sipping cocktail. Silky and smooth yet bright berry overwhelm and the layers build a long lasting finish. Even their dark brooding Petite Sirahs have the bright blueberry aromas and distinctly California flavors with dark brooding complexity. Turley is worth a stop on your next trip to the Central Coast or checking out next time you see it on a wine list.